Two Defendants Dismissed in Tyler Skaggs Wrongful Death Lawsuit

Two defendants in the wrongful death case involving a former pitcher for California Angles, were dismissed. The two will not stand trial in the Tyler Skaggs wrongful death lawsuit filed by his family in California.

Skaggs, one of the youngest pitchers for the California Angels’ baseball team, was found dead in his Texas hotel room on July 1, 2019. When the authorities finally released his cause of death, they revealed that he had died from a fentanyl overdose. Fentanyl is the strongest version of opiates out there right now. 

Skaggs’ family decided to file a wrongful death suit against the people they believed supplied their son the fentanyl. They filed suit against two of the team’s public relations employees. The allegations are that one of the PR guys, Erick Kay, was the one supplying the player with the drugs. The family also claimed that Kay’s supervisor, Tim Mead was involved in the distribution of fentanyl. So, they filed a suit in Los Angeles County against both Kay and Mead. They also named the team itself in the Tyler Skaggs wrongful death suit.

But on October 26, the court released both Kay and Mead. The baseball team remains a defendant in the lawsuit. There were also federal charges filed against Kay for distributing fentanyl. Those charges have not been dismissed and he is set to stand trial on November 9.

If Kay is found guilty, there is a chance the family can file additional legal action against him. The family may also appeal the dismissals if they choose. The court officially moved the case from Los Angeles County to Orange County. There were no other details offered regarding the court’s decision.

If your loved one has died at the hands of another, you too may have a legal claim against the person responsible. Call and talk to one of our wrongful death lawyers in California.

Source: https://www.ocregister.com/2021/10/26/eric-kay-tim-mead-removed-as-defendants-in-one-tyler-skaggs-wrongful-death-suit/

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